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20130115
20130123
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KQEH (PBS) 9
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
's been thinking about connecting versus social networking. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> there was this story in our local paper a while back. a married couple was sitting on a love seat in their home, virtually knee-to-knee. each had a laptop computer and they were typing. the interviewer asked them what they were doing. the answer: "we're arguing about something and we're doing it so our friends can be part of the discussion." is that really connecting in the way all these social networks are supposed to help us do? funny, isn't it? we have the power to be more electronically networked than ever before, but are we really connected? when we ask someone today if they have lots of friends, do they answer with actual, physical friends or electronic friends? i'm not in the 25-35 demographic, so maybe i see things differently. to me, connection comes from finding an area of common interest; exploring that interest with others and physical contact with one another. if i read something online about a friend and want to talk with them about it, i call them. i want to hear th
america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to survive and thrive. and yes, there is a magic ingredient. >> continuity. in the down cycles of the economy
in massachusetts, he and i when we first got together, he was all about blues. he gave me an entire education, really, along witmy brother, allen, who was a blues singer until he died. that and the sort of brazilian, afro-cuban, caribbean connection, those were really my main sources. that is what i was interested in listening to, and that is what i wanted to sound like. there has been this thing about white people stealing black music. i think there is no doubt about that, but there are also white musicians, eric clapton, ry cooder, phil collins, you mentioned, many, many players who were just brought up on it and loved black music. they just want to sound that way. when i sit down and think, that is what comes out. that is what i am trying to emulate. marvin gaye, sam cooke, huge giants and people who are listen to, just cut the debt linked as a kid, all that mt time -- just studied at length as a kid. that is not the case now for kids. it is all shattered to smithereens. you are distracted so frequently, you don't get a chance to really listen and reflect. that marvin gaye approved of my -
. and the user interface is far more suitable for places like offices, hospitals, educational establishments. and possibly new international markets. >> reporter: he wouldn't say if that includes the u.s. but you have to wonder why costa would bother with this huge u.s. retail trade show, if it didn't have plan brewing. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: we continue our monday series with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best research on business, the economy and investing. we call it "nbr-u". our partners combine over 400 years of business knowledge-- harvard, stanford, wharton and vanderbilt universities. every monday we speak with top professors about key money issues. and you can read in-depth articles at: www.nbr.com, just look for the "nbr-u" tab. tonight: money market funds. from small investors to giant pension funds and big corporations: more than $2.5 trillion are in money market accounts. but, as the credit crunch illustrated, one important difference is what those funds are invested in. we spoke with robert pozen, senior lecturer at harvard business
is high amongst the youth. so we continue to do peace education amongst young people, we're doing leadership with girls. because the one thing i keep saying to the young women and to my colleagues, we've left a legacy, president sirleaf is leaving a legacy, but all of those legacies will only be a legacy if we have young women to walk in our shoes when we leave the stage. so that's the kind of work that we do now. beyond that, we're using our experiences from liberia into other countries. a few years ago we conducted a nonviolence campaign during sierra leone's elections. for the first time my group and i have organized something we called the first-ever west african women's elections observation mission. so we're having women from all over west africa go to observe liberia's elections. tavis: i love coming to work every day. i love coming to this studio every day, because i never know what icon and what great artist, what great humanitarian i'm going to meet, but it's not often that i just see courage walk up in this studio, courage just walk up in this building. doesn't happen e
to be a key player in immigration reform as well. >> immigration reform. >> to the educators he basically said, get your costs in line and maybe you better do more online classes because we can't afford to pay you anymore. we're not going to raise tuition. >> he says, yeah, you got some prop 30 money. if you want more, get your act together, teach more, research less. i want to ask you about the supermajority in the legislature. he's governor. the democrats have a supermajority in both houses of the legislator. >> that's not a great time to be governor when you have that many democrats and you're a democrat. they all think we can spend a lot of money. >> he said it's not a blank check. >> he has to actually -- he's the person who has to say, and this is -- republicans are looking to jerry brown to do it. he's a wonderful cheapskate. he's famously cheap. so it's not -- this is not going to be fun for him. he's going to be governor no. that's not the role -- >> that's right. he's more likely to play that role. that's why i think as a political figure he is the governor to watch in this country r
that will make the next counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is d
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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